One Improv and Four Covers (2013Aug27)

XperDunn plays Piano
August 27th, 2013

Improv – Shangri – La

 

Well, I think this is my best effort on these favorites from my “Complete Carpenters” for solo piano and voice book–these are the treacliest and most banal of their repertoire–only a real sap has any chance of enjoying those 4 recordings  of their repertoire (which fortunately includes me). I defy you to sit through all four–it can’t be done.

 

 

XperDunn plays Piano
August 27th, 2013

4 Covers of ‘Hits by The Carpenters’:

(1.) “(They Long To Be) Close To You”

(2.) “Rainy Days and Mondays”

(3.) “Yesterday Once More”

(4.) “Sing”

 

“(They Long To Be) Close To You” (2013Aug27)
Words by Hal David. Music by Burt Bacharach

“(They Long to Be) Close to You” is a popular song written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. The version recorded by The Carpenters, which became a hit in 1970, is the best known.

In 1970, it was released by Karen and Richard Carpenter on their album Close to You, and it became their breakthrough hit. The song stayed at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks.

With “(They Long to Be) Close to You”, The Carpenters earned a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Performance by a Duo, Group or Chorus in 1971. It became the first of three Grammy Awards they would win during their careers.

(c) 1963 by U.S. Songs Inc, USA
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“Rainy Days and Mondays” (2013Aug27)
Words by Paul Williams. Music by Roger Nichols.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: “Rainy Days and Mondays” is a 1971 song by The Carpenters that went to #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and it was the duo’s fourth #1 song on the Adult Contemporary singles chart. However, the song failed to chart in the United Kingdom until it went to #63 in a reissue there in 1993. “Rainy Days and Mondays was certified Gold by the RIAA.

The song was composed in 1971 by then fairly unknown composers Roger Nichols and Paul Williams. It was released as the first track on the album Carpenters. The B-side on the single is “Saturday”.

(c) 1970 by Almo Music Corp., USA

“Yesterday Once More” (2013Aug27)
Words by John Bettis
Music by Richard Carpenter

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
“Yesterday Once More”, written by Richard Carpenter and John Bettis, is a hit song by The Carpenters from their 1973 album Now & Then. Composed in the key of E, “Yesterday Once More” features a long middle section, consisting of eight covers of 1960s tunes incorporated into a faux oldies radio program. The work takes up the entire side B of the album.

The single version of the song peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart becoming their 5th number two hit and making them the act with the second most number two hits on the chart behind only Madonna. The song also peaked at number 1 on the easy listening chart, becoming their eighth number 1 on that chart in four years.

It is the Carpenters’ biggest-selling record worldwide and their best-selling single in the UK, peaking at number 2. Richard Carpenter admitted on a Japanese documentary that it is his favorite of all the songs he’s written. He has performed an instrumental version at concerts. According to Cash Box, on June 2, 1973, “Yesterday Once More” was the highest-debuting single at No. 71. By August 4, it had reached No. 1.

(c) 1973 by Almo Music Corporation / Hammer and Nails Music, USA

“Sing” (2013Aug27)
Words & Music by Joe Raposo.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
“Sing” is a popular song created for Sesame Street that gained popularity when performed by The Carpenters, who made it a #3 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1973.

“Sing” was written by Joe Raposo, the staff songwriter for the popular children’s TV show Sesame Street. In its initial appearance, the song was sung by adult human cast member, and Muppets, including Big Bird. “The Kids” sang “Sing” for The Sesame Street Book & Record, a recording re-released on the 2003 Songs from the Street CD set.

Karen and Richard Carpenter heard the song for the first time as guests on ABC television special Robert Young with the Young in 1973. The Carpenters loved the song and said in retrospect that they knew it would “be a hit”. Their associates thought they were “nuts”.

The song acted as their debut single from the LP album Now & Then, released in 1973. “Sing” reached number three on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and number-one on the easy listening chart, and it became the group’s seventh gold single.

Their recording of the song was produced and arranged by Richard Carpenter, and engineered by Ray Gerhardt. The lead vocal was sung by Karen Carpenter, with backing vocals by Karen and Richard Carpenter and the Jimmy Joyce Children’s Choir. Keyboards were by Richard Carpenter, bass by Joe Osborn, drums by Karen Carpenter, and recorders by Tom Scott. In 1974, while touring Japan, The Carpenters recorded their first live album in Osaka.

The album contained a new version of “Sing” with the children’s chorus sung by the Kyoto Children’s Choir. The song is featured on the album Live in Japan which was recorded in June 1974 and released in Japan only on March 7, 1975. This album has since been released on CD and is available as an import.

(c) 1971 by Jonico Music Corp., USA
All Rights Reserved
International Copyright Secured

 

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All the above has been cut and pasted

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Once again, many thanks to my cousin, Lisa, for the use of her photo of their 2006 Meridian-408 Motoryacht.

Six (6) covers of Old Standards a la ‘American Songbook’

20130723XD-SixSongCoversStartingWithS(TITLEs_card)

 

How Do I Spell Successes? With Six Esses!
In other words: these six (6) song titles all start with ‘S’:

XperDunn plays Piano Covers on July 27th, 2013
Six Song Covers Starting With ‘S’

(“Love is Lovelier”) “The Second Time Around”
“The Shadow Of Your Smile”
“Shangri La”
“Siboney”
“Softly, As I Leave You”
“Stairway To The Stars”
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

“The Second Time Around” is a song with words by Sammy Cahn and music by Jimmy Van Heusen. It was introduced in the 1960 film High Time, sung by Bing Crosby with Henry Mancini conducting his orchestra, and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song.

Its theme is captured by its first two lines:

Love is lovelier the second time around,
Still wonderful with both feet on the ground.

It is especially associated with Frank Sinatra, who released multiple recordings of the ballad.
Jane Morgan sang the song on a 1961 episode of The Jack Benny Program.
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

“The Shadow of Your Smile”, also known as “Love Theme from The Sandpiper”, is a popular song. The music was written by Johnny Mandel with the lyrics written by Paul Francis Webster.
The song was introduced in the 1965 film The Sandpiper, with a trumpet solo by Jack Sheldon and later became a minor hit for Tony Bennett (Johnny Mandel arranged and conducted his version as well).
It won the Grammy Award for Song of the Year and the Academy Award for Best Original Song.
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

“Shangri-La”
The ‘finale’ song from ‘Shangri-La’, a 1956 musical with a book and lyrics by James Hilton, Jerome Lawrence, and Robert E. Lee and music by Harry Warren. Based on Hilton’s classic 1933 novel “Lost Horizon”
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

“Siboney” (Canto Siboney) is a 1929 classic Cuban song by Ernesto Lecuona. The music is in cut time, originally written in C major.
The lyrics were reportedly written by Lecuona while away from Cuba and is about the homesickness he is experiencing (Siboney is also a town in Cuba, and can also refer to Cuba in general)
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

“Softly, as I Leave You” is a popular Italian song composed by Giorgio Calabrese and Tony De Vita (1932–1998), translated into English by Hal Shaper.
It was originally an Italian success by Mina, at the Sanremo Music Festival, entitled “Piano” (“Softly”). Mina published a recording of the song first as a single in 1960 and later as well on an EP and on three LPs.

The English songwriter Hal Shaper noticed the song and in November 1961 wrote English lyrics to the melody, calling it “Softly, as I Leave You.” The best known versions are those by Matt Monro (#10 on the British charts in 1962) and Frank Sinatra (#27 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #4 on the adult contemporary chart in 1964).
The Sinatra family announced Frank’s death on May 14, 1998 by placing an announcement on their website that was accompanied by a recording of the singer’s version of the song.
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“Stairway To The Stars” -from the United Artists Motion Picture “SOME LIKE IT HOT”-original song 1935 lyrics by Mitchell Parish, music by Matt Malneck and Frank Signorelli. Glenn Miller’s version has alternate lyrics.